After the devastating one-two blow of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in late 2005, I realized that many of the old trees I felt would be around through my lifetime could be lost overnight. Even centuries-old trees are not invincible to the increasingly powerful hurricanes the Gulf Coast has experienced.

So I turned my focus to documenting the elders and the survivors: the 100 largest and oldest oaks in Louisiana. I began with a search for the original 43 live oaks that were charter members of the Live Oak Society when it was first proposed by Dr. Edwin L. Stephens in 1934. From my original search, I found that almost 20% of these centenarian trees had been lost in the 75 years since the Society was founded — mostly due to urban expansion, development and storms.

In 2015, I set a personal goal to find, photograph, and remeasure all of the oaks in Louisiana that are 29 feet in circumference or greater (those with an approximate age of 350 years or more) – the very oldest living oaks remaining in Louisiana. I was able to locate 24 such oaks during 2015 and the story and photos from that year's efforts can be viewed in this website and on my blog – The 100 Oaks Project.  

The 100 Oaks Project

After the devastating one-two blow of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in late 2005, I realized that many of the old trees I felt would be around through my lifetime could be lost overnight. Even centuries-old trees are not invincible to the increasingly powerful hurricanes the Gulf Coast has experienced.

So I turned my focus to documenting the elders and the survivors: the 100 largest and oldest oaks in Louisiana. I began with a search for the original 43 live oaks that were charter members of the Live Oak Society when it was first proposed by Dr. Edwin L. Stephens in 1934. From my original search, I found that almost 20% of these centenarian trees had been lost in the 75 years since the Society was founded — mostly due to urban expansion, development and storms.

In 2015, I set a personal goal to find, photograph, and remeasure all of the oaks in Louisiana that are 29 feet in circumference or greater (those with an approximate age of 350 years or more) – the very oldest living oaks remaining in Louisiana. I was able to locate 24 such oaks during 2015 and the story and photos from that year's efforts can be viewed in this website and on my blog – The 100 Oaks Project.